Pain-Coping Arthritis Blogs You Should Follow

It’s a pain that might creep up slowly with a dull, mild discomfort in your joints. Or it might rage suddenly without warning, bringing on a stabbing intensity as sharp as a knife. The pain might come and go, or it may last hours. This pain is arthritis, and it’s likely you know someone living with it.

Arthritis impacts more than 50 million adults and 300,000 children in the U.S.  According to The Arthritis Foundation, the number of people affected by the condition is expected to increase to 67 million by 2030. More research is needed to combat this health crisis, a disease and source of chronic pain for so many people that it is often marginalized by misinformed attitudes, old wise tales, and social stigma.

May is National Arthritis Month. Now is an ideal time to gain a greater understanding of arthritis, its symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and the supportive, instructive community accessible online.

Quick Overview

Arthritis includes more than 100 different types of joint disease and related conditions. I have written previously about osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile arthritis. In the most basic terms, arthritis is inflammation of the joints that causes swelling, stiffness, reduced range of motion, and pain that can become chronic. It can affect your ankles and toes, back, hip, fingers, wrists, elbows, shoulders, or neck. The heart, eyes, lungs, kidneys and skin can sometimes also be impacted.

Arthritis can also affect your muscles, resulting in muscle weakness or fatigue. The extra weight from obesity can strain your joints if you are not eating well and exercising regularly.

Many people dismiss arthritis as a condition of older adulthood, but arthritis can strike any age, gender or race, and it is the leading cause of disability in the United States.

Previously, I wrote how best to manage your arthritis pain as well as how to recognize the warning signs of autoimmune arthritis. Take a look at those for more in-depth information.

Arthritis Infographic

Where Can I Learn More?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers a wealth of information about arthritis. Here are a few valuable links:

  1. Arthritis At A Glance
  2. Risk Factors
  3. Physical Activity for Arthritis
  4. FAQs

Blogs are a great resource for educating yourself about arthritis. Many people living with the disease generously share their stories. A few that I recommend include:

Creaky Joints

Part of the nonprofit Global Healthy Living Foundation, this creation by an arthritis patient and a social entrepreneur offers a robust and growing online patient community providing meaningful support, education, innovative advocacy and global research updates for those living with the disease and their families.

RheumaBlog

Leslie Vandever, a frequent contributor to RheumatoidArthritis.net, has been sharing her personal journey living with arthritis since 2009.

Arthritic Chick

Voted the 2017 Best Rheumatoid Arthritis Blog by Healthline, this blogger lives with multiple conditions and writes in-depth about her diagnoses and medications, as well as healthy pain-fighting recipes.

RA Warrior

President of the Rheumatoid Patient Foundation, Kelly O’Neill Young brings you arthritis information that’s easy to understand, strategies to manage the disease, and tackles topics like “What’s this symptom?” or “How do I cope?”

The Old Lady in My Bones

Diagnosed with early Rheumatoid Arthritis in her thirties, Vancouver-based writer and poet J.G. Chayko developed her blog to create awareness that arthritis is not a disease just for the elderly.

All Grown Up with JIA

Do you ever wonder what your child’s life will be like after they grow up with juvenile arthritis? Diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis at 13 months, Stefanie Larsen helps other young adults navigate the usual transitional life events, such as marriage and starting a family, when those transitions are complicated by JIA.

The Doctors’ Rheum

Written by a board-certified rheumatologist, this blogger discusses food, nutrition, exercise, and healthy habits for those living with arthritis.

Arthritis Connect

Owned and operated by Alliance Health, this social network empowers people living with arthritis and connects members to support communities for a growing number of health conditions.

Living with Arthritis

The official blog of the Arthritis Foundation, this resource covers a variety of topics, including natural therapies, nutrition, pain management, symptom management, exercise and surgery.

Titanium Triathlete

Dina Neils did not let two hip replacements stop her from qualifying for the USA Triathlon National Championship and completing the race with a personal best record in 2015. With her blog, she creates awareness and inspiration “for those battling adversity to pursue their dreams and not allow a medical diagnosis to detour them.”

Psoriasis in Living Color 

Diane Talbert offers a unique perspective of a woman of color living with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Her mission: “I want people to know they are not alone in this; I just want to get the word out.”

Remember, no one is immune to pain but together we can overcome it.

Sources: Everyday Health, NursingDegree.net, Arthritis Foundation, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Posted in Arthritis, Blog.

8 Comments

  1. I have a pretty intensely long history with chronic low back pain post 2 failed back surgeries, have posterior tibial tendinitis in both ankles, had four unrelated foot surgeries, have arthritis in both hands, have had 2 right knee surgeries and here’s what I have to say about medical marijuana products like this here in https://www.bonzaseeds.com/blog/fruity-pebbles/.. some of it is like using whatever over the counter stuff works best for your pain if there is something that does. Some isn’t made with any THC and some is (depends on who is making it). You can get either one. If for any reason you have to drug test don’t do it having had used something with THC in it. Whether it works for one person or not is probably pretty subjective though I have heard a lot of people say it does work for their discomforts. I find it helps my hands/fingers re arthritis. For my low back I often use a Thermacare heatwrap (has magnets) and that seems to help me quite a bit. I don’t think medical marijuana properties or ointment is snake oil tho I would suggest getting it from a reputable collective or person knowledgeable in this industry. Good luck!!!! Whatever helps you to keep moving and stay functional and isn’t creating worse problems for you! Medical marijuana products is pretty benign from what I can tell so if it works for you that’s great!

  2. My sister has reumetoid arthritis. She was diagnosed when she was 12 and has used medical marijuana strains and one of them was this https://www.bonzaseeds.com/blog/moby-dick/, along with her other meds for the past 9 years. I’m not sure how it helps if not by just taking her mind off the pain. I’ll have to ask her. She was supposed to be in a wheel chair by the time she was 15 but she’s holding on strong. She doesn’t use it all the time but Ive had to go help her roll a few joints because her joints in her hands have been so swollen. I feel sorry for anyone who has to suffer from that kind of pain on a daily basis. Even if it does help her by elevating her mood and taking her mind off the pain, I say more power to her.

  3. I was diagnosed of RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (RA) in July 2009, It started in two fingers on my right hand and one finger in my left hand. The right side of my body was constantly aching and fatigue was so severe. I was put on Naprosyn and after some time i didn’t feel any different, so i started on a natural treatment from RICH HERBS FOUNDATION, their RA FORMULA treatment effectively reversed my Rheumatoid Arthritis condition. The swellings, stiffness, fatigue and joint/muscle pains has subsided. I feel better overall. Visit ww w. richherbsfoundation. com. Six months after the treatment, I made an appointment with a rheumatologist in Houston, after examining me, she looked at me and told me I did not have Rheumatoid Arthritis. Its almost like a miracle!

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